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milk

From Cow to Glass: How we bottle our milk

Our milk is super fresh. It all starts with our Sassy Cows. The cows are milked and that milk is brought over to our creamery where we bottle it. Learn more about that process in our new product video.

Summer on Our Farms

Summer is always a busy time on the farm. There’s hay to be made, events hosted, all on top of every day chores. Here are some pictures of what’s been going on at our dairies.

Sassy Cow Cow Friends
Our cows are enjoying the pasture life.
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We have new babies born everyday. This sweet girl is a Brown Swiss.
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With the recent warm weather, the corn has really grown!

 

Sassy Cow in new barn
Our dry cows at our organic farm are enjoying their new barn.
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Hay is made about three times per year on both farms. This cropped hay will become cow food for the upcoming year.
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This is the tractor we use to cut the hay.
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Some dry cows at our traditional dairy hang out in the shade on the first day of summer.

Interested in coming to visit? Contact Mara at 608-837-7766 or mara@sassycowcreamery.com.

 

Know your milk terms part 1: Pasteurization and homogenization

There’s a lot of information on a milk label. The brand of milk, the fat content, where it was bottled. In know your milk terms, we will cover some of the terms that are found on our milk label.

Pasteurization

Pasteurization is the method used to kill bacteria in milk and was introduced by scientist Louis Pasteur in the late 1800s. While milk in the cow’s udder is sterile, bacteria can hang out in the teat and on milking equipment and end up in the milk, even with proper cleaning.

These bacteria can cause illness if not destroyed. Pasteurization works by using heat and time to kill the bacteria. The most common type of pasteurization is known as high temperature, short time (HTST), where milk is heated to at least 161 degrees for 15 seconds. This is what we use here at our creamery.

Another type that is gaining popularity is known as ultra pasteurization or UHT. Many organic milks are pasteurized using this type, giving it longer shelf life. Our organic milk uses the same method of pasteurization as our traditional milk, HTST.

Sassy Cow plant
Our creamery. This is where our milk is pasteurized and homogenized before being bottled.

Homogenization

The majority of milk in the U.S. is homogenized, meaning the fat is formed into smaller globules so they are suspended evenly throughout the milk. This makes the milk very uniform. Milk that is not homogenized will have a “cream top” since fat will separate out from the rest of the milk and rise to the top. Nothing is added or removed from the milk in this process.

Stay tuned for “Know you milk terms” part 2!

Have questions about our milk? Feel free to contact us at 608-837-7766 or mara@sassycowcreamery.com.

Dairy Goodness: The Power of Protein

Milk is often referred to as “nature’s most perfect food.” It has carbohydrates, essential vitamins and minerals, quality fats and of course protein.

But did you know milk contains 8 grams of protein per 1 cup serving? That’s more protein per serving than in one medium egg, three slices of bacon or 2 tablespoons of peanut butter; foods traditionally hailed for their protein content.

SassyCow-MilkOutlook-Protein-Pairing

It’s been widely accepted by health professionals that quality protein helps curb hunger and aids in weight loss. Not to mention protein is the building block for muscle growth and regeneration. New research suggests that consuming quality protein at breakfast may be the best time to eat it. Breakfast is generally a meal heavier on carbohydrates than protein but adding an 8 ounce glass of milk to the meal can easily help accomplish your daily requirement. This also helps keep you fuller longer and you consume fewer calories throughout the day.
Daily requirements will vary from person to person and how active you are. Since the body can only use so much protein at a time, consuming a consistent amount at each meal is the best way to optimize how the body uses protein. To find your daily protein requirement and to learn more, visit the Milk Life website.

Here is an easy and healthy recipe to get your day started with milk!

Recipe

Overnight oats are an easy, healthy and hearty breakfast. Pair with a large hard-boiled egg on the side and enjoy your breakfast with an ice cold glass of milk!

OvernightOats

Ingredients

  • 1/2 cup – milk
  • 1/4 teaspoon – vanilla extract
  • 1/3 cup – oats
  • 2 tablespoons – sliced almonds
  • 1/4 cup – fresh blueberries
  • 1 – hard boiled egg
  • 1 cup – fat free milk

Directions

In a mixing bowl, combine 1/2 cup milk and 1/4 teaspoon vanilla extract. Mix in 1/3 cup oats and refrigerate overnight. In the morning, top oats with 1/4 cup fresh blueberries and 2 tablespoons of sliced almonds.

 

 

 

Keep milk fresher for longer with these easy tips

At some point, all milk drinkers have it experienced it, sour milk. And that stinks. Maybe it wasn’t stored properly at home or too much was purchased at a time, but most can agree that it’s not fun to have to throw away that milk. Here are some tips to keep milk fresher for longer from the time you visit the market to the time it is in the fridge.

  1. At the grocery store, pick up milk near the end of your shopping trip. This way the milk doesn’t warm up while you finish shopping.
  2. Pick the milk with the farthest out “sell by” date. Sell date and expiration date are different. Generally, there’s a three to five day window after the “sell by” date passes that the milk will remain fresh. But once milk has been opened, that date may change based on storage.
  3. Only purchase what you can consume. For example, if your family is going on vacation later in the week, maybe it’s a good idea to only purchase a half gallon of milk instead of the usual gallon.
  4. Store milk on refrigerator shelves rather than in the door. Shelves stay colder than doors.
  5. Check your refrigerator temperature. Milk should be stored at around 40 degrees.
  6. Store milk in its original container.
  7. If milk has been left out of refrigeration for more than two hours, it’s best to throw this milk away.
  8. Milk can be frozen for up to 6 weeks without flavor alteration. Freezing generally works better with skim or low fat milk versus whole because during thawing, milk can separate and lose its smooth texture. Always thaw frozen milk in the refrigerator.

These tips were originally provided by DairyGoodness.com. If you have questions about our milk or milk storage, feel free to contact the creamery at 608-837-7766.

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